Online Map to Visualize Economic Impact of Federal EB-5 Immigration Program

The Alward Institute for Collaborative Science is proud to announce the release of its first online GIS map. Using results from our 2012 economic impact study of the EB-5 immigration program, we’ve been able to visualize the impact of the federal program on all 50 states and 435 congressional districts.

According to our results, we estimate that spending associated with EB-5 regional center investors contributed $3.39 billion to U.S. GDP and supported over 42,000 U.S. jobs in FY2012. Likewise, spending by EB-5 investors also contributed $447 million to federal government tax revenues and $265 million to state and local government tax revenues in FY2012. These estimates include direct, indirect, and induced impacts associated with investment spending, household spending, and other immigration expenses.

To see how these impacts are distributed across states and congressional districts, please follow the link below and then click on the icon to view our 2012 EB-5 Investment Impact map:

http://alward.maps.arcgis.com/home/index.html

For more information or to comment, please visit our website at www.AlwardInstitute.org, email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call us at 970-217-3942.

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Improving Economic Contribution Studies for Regional Analysis

The Alward Institute for Collaborative Science is proud to announce the publication of its latest journal article by regional economists Phil Watson, Stephen Cooke, David Kay and Gregory Alward: A Method for Improving Economic Contribution Studies for Regional Analysis. The paper was recently published  in Volume 45(1) of the Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy. 

It presents an improved method for economic contribution analysis that utilizes a Leontief Inverse matrix and diagonal matrix of final demand to simultaneously estimate both gross and base measures of output for all industries within a region. These two measures vary by industry but sum to the regional output total observed in the underlying social accounts. When used as a comparative statistic, these two measures provide additional insight into the role an industry plays in supporting economic activity through export expansion (attracting new dollars to a region) or import-substitution (recirculating existing dollars within a region). These insights are useful in understanding the current structure of a regional economy and targeting development strategy accordingly. Additionally, this method also prevents the possibility of double counting, relies on actual data to determine a sector's exogenous sales, and provides a way to rigorously benchmark regional impact studies.

The article is publicly available at http://www.jrap-journal.org/. For more information please visit our website at www.AlwardInstitute.org, email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call us at 970-217-3942.

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Welcome to the Alward Institute Blog Site

 

 

 

Welcome to the Alward Institute Blog

Welcome to the Alward Institute blog! Our economists and researchers will use this space to share periodic updates about our latest research projects, regional economies, market trends, and economic development, analytics, and models. Our blog posts are meant to be conversational, so please feel free to share comments, ideas, and questions plus suggest ideas for future blog posts.

 

The Alward Institute for Collaborative Science is a 501(c)(3) non-profit institution with a mission to partner with business, government and academia in order to further research and education in regional science. Some of our current projects include measuring the economic impact of the EB-5 immigration program, estimating the value of local food systems, understanding the structure and function of regional economies, uncovering potential bottlenecks in regional supply chains, improving algorithms to estimate commodity trade flows, and much more.

 

We are excited to share information about these and other projects through this new site. We plan to update our blog regularly. Please check back soon to see our first research post. To comment on this Blog, please register your full name and email address in our database.  (Your email will not be shared.)  We ask that your first name and last name be used as your login ID to eliminate any confusion regarding who submitted what comments. Your password is totally your choice.  We are excited to start blogging with you. 

 

As always, for more information on how to partner with us on these research projects and other opportunities, please visit our website at www.AlwardInstitute.org or call us at 970-217-3942.

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